Menu

Home | About the Chapter

About the Chapter

A leading voice on children’s health and well being in Minnesota, MNAAP represents more than 1,000 pediatricians, pediatric providers, and pediatric trainees. Simply put, we’re committed to #PutKidsFirst

The depth and breadth of pediatric expertise in the state is something we tap into regularly — for education, advocacy and networking purposes. Because every child deserves to grow up healthy and safe.

Read our articles in Minnesota Pediatrician. Watch our interviews with local media outlets. Join our bi-monthly conference calls on key pediatric issues. Listen to our testimony at the State Capitol. Get to know us at the chapter’s annual Hot Topics in Pediatrics Conference or Pediatrician’s Day at the Capitol.

Regardless of how involved you want to become, you’ll benefit from being a member of our Minnesota chapter.

Join Now»

 

Board Nominations

MNAAP’s board is comprised of nearly 30 pediatricians and trainees from rural and urban clinics and hospitals across Minnesota.

If you are interested in serving on the MNAAP Board of Directors, please send an email to cairns@mnaap.org before March 31st indicating your interest in serving on the Board of Directors. Include a copy of your CV and provide a brief (max 200 words) explanation of why you would like to serve on the MNAAP Board of Directors and what special expertise/skills/interests would you bring to the Board if elected.

Expectations:

  • Board members serve a 3-year term and can leave the board after their first term is up or stay on for one additional term for a total of 6 years.
  • Those new Board members elected in May will serve a term of July 1 until June 30 three years later.
  • The nominating committee is composed of past presidents of the MNAAP who met and reviewed information on candidates and make recommendations to the MNAAP Executive Committee for the ballot.
  • Candidates on the ballot run in uncontested races (no opponent) so that the Board can ensure a good representation from across the state, practice  locations, and diversity
  • The Board meets 4 times per year in the evening, usually from 6:30-8:30 p.m. It has been meeting on Wednesday or Thursday evenings over the past five years, usually at a pediatric hospital or at the MN Medical Association building in Minneapolis
  • Board members are also strongly encouraged to attend the membership dinner at the annual Hot Topics in Pediatrics- and/or the Pediatrics Day at the Capitol.
  • Board members sign a “conflict of interest” statement at the first board meeting indicating that as board members they are working to promote pediatrics across the state, not a particular organization and also indicate if a conflict of interest prevent participation in a board vote
  • There is no financial compensation for Board service…just dinner at the meeting…and working with a great group of pediatricians from across the state. Mileage is reimbursed for Board members traveling from greater Minnesota to the Board meeting.
  • The Board members also serve as the board for the sister organization which is a 501c3 foundation which receives grant and government funds to promote the MNAAP chapter member priorities, The Board is called the Minnesota Academy of Pediatrics Foundation
  • Board members are encouraged to also participate in one of the chapter’s work groups that meet twice a year or monthly by conference call.

After a careful review of the chapter’s annual report and presentation by MNAAP President Dr. Andrew Kiragu, the District Vice Chairpersons at AAP’s Annual Leadership Forum in March selected MNAAP to receive the 2018 Outstanding Large Chapter of the Year Award.

 

The award is based on chapter accomplishments in the following areas: child health initiatives, chapter engagement activities, finances, membership retention and recruitment, and chapter management and governance.

 

MNAAP’s major achievements in 2017 included advocacy and education, particularly with regard to the immigration ban, Medicaid, CHIP, immunizations, behavioral health, poverty and the state’s Child and Teen Checkup (C&TC) program.

 

Minnesota is considered a large chapter with just over 1,000 members and 600 voting fellows. Other finalists included New York 2 and Kentucky.

 

The chapter received a plaque and honorarium in the amount of $2,000.

 

AAP has been awarding chapters for their performance since 1964. Of its 66 chapters, 17 are defined as large. Minnesota is among those 17.

 

This is the third time Minnesota has won the award in the last decade; it was also selected in 2009 under the leadership of Anne Edwards, MD, FAAP and in 2013 under the leadership of Robert Jacobson, MD, FAAP.

Faith and Medicine Project

The chapter partnered with 17 Imams to provide education to over 30,000 Somalis (parents, adults and youth) at 16 mosques during Ramadan and during the measles outbreak that primarily affected Somali children.

A measles vaccine message was developed with input from 20 Somali parents in focus groups and two videos were prepared to feature a Somali physician and a Somali parent. Twenty physicians, nurses, and pediatric residents accompanied the Imams at over 20 events and answered questions during/after prayer session, primarily about the importance of measles immunizations, concerns about autism, and resources.

Over 2,500 MMR vaccines were administered by clinics to Somali children during the measles outbreak. There were over 14,000 downloads of the parent Somali immunization and autism videos.

 

Behavioral Health/Substance Abuse

The chapter increased pediatric clinician use of depression screening in adolescent well teen checkups from 40 percent in 2015 to 75 percent in 2017 through collaboration with state agencies to require depression screening during adolescent well teen checkups per Bright Futures. Additionally, the chapter provided eight webinars and live training on behavioral health and substance abuse topics identified by members and identified state and national resources on.

 

Child Abuse

The chapter hosted four free CME webinars for pediatric providers covering case-based abusive head trauma, working effectively with counties and the CPS system, sexual abuse in children, and inflicted abdominal trauma. Additionally, a one-pager on medical neglect was developed in partnership with the Department of Human Services.

 

Poverty/Health Disparities

The chapter hosted several webinars, developed a one-pager highlighting key pediatric disparities.

Membership

  • One of the highest points ever at 1,015 members.
  • Over 150 people registered to attend a portion of this conference — a record attendance
  • Workgroups have never been stronger. More than 50 members are actively engaged in MNAAP’s work groups.

 

Behavioral Health

  • 6 pediatric clinics participated in learning collaborative funded by MDH to integrate behavioral health into their pediatric primary care clinic, resulting in a 25% increase in behavioral health screening and nearly a 20% improvement in connecting children/teens with a behavioral health provider over baseline rates.

 

Immunization

  • 35 MN pediatricians at 10 clinics are participating in an HPV MOC4 virtual learning collaborative along with over 100 additional Midwest pediatricians from five other states. Selected 3 clinics to receive additional funds to implement HPV quality improvement
  • Provided training on HPV to over 100 pediatric clinicians in partnership with the University of MN, MDH, the American Cancer Society, Rotary International, Mayo Clinic, Allina Health System and other stakeholders

 

Poverty/Disparities

  • 4 primary care clinics received funding through a grant received from the U of M to establish or improve food insecurity screening and referrals.
  • Child abuse and maltreatment
  • Identified and shared concerns about with state agencies and the governor’s legislative taskforce about how the state handles child abuse screening, intake, and investigation
  • Testified before Governor’s Taskforce on Protection of Children
  • Met with the president of the Minnesota Association of County Social Services Association to discuss ways providers and county social workers can better work together
  • Developed template language when communicating with families about the need to make a report, which is on website

 

Advocacy

  • Over 100 pediatric clinicians attended Peds Day at the Capitol in April
  • Supported legislation to strengthen the child maltreatment reporting system
  • Supported partner coalitions, including MinneMinds, Raise it for Health, SHIP, and Minnesotans for Healthy Kids.

Address Need for Child Abuse Reduction/Prevention

  • 2015 annual meeting keynote speakers Dr.Vincent Palusci  and Star Tribune Investigative Reporter Brian Stahl drew more than 100 attendees
  • Created a child abuse workgroup, which meetings monthly, consisting of more than 2 dozen pediatricians across the state
  • Developed talking points and a media statement on discipline and physical punishment
  • Learned that 77 percent of respondents to its annual member survey were not familiar or only somewhat familiar with AAP’s guidelines for child abuse screening
  • Asked at least five pediatricians to author or contribute to articles on child abuse topics in Minnesota Pediatrician
  • Promoting distribution of statewide child abuse screening protocol
  • In partnership with other groups, began tracking implementation of key guidelines recommended by the Governor’s Taskforce

 

Address Need for Increased Pediatric Vaccination Rates

  • Implemented HPV training for pediatric clinicians and pediatric residents throughout the year at clinic locations, training programs, annual meeting and online training that reached over 230 pediatric providers
  • Implemented educational opportunities on MMR for pediatric clinicians, including online vaccine hesitancy training
  • Increased pediatric clinician education about immunizations in target communities
  • Successfully prevented expansion of vaccine administration by non-pediatric clinicians to infants and children

 

Reduce Preventable Injuries and Violence

  • Supported development of over 1000 copies of patient safety cards distributed in English, Spanish, Hmong and Somali
  • Supported anti-tobacco policies and legislation, leading to three major cities/counties banning youth tobacco product access in Minnesota
  • Over 1,000 pediatric advocates in the state received information on rural ATV safety

 

Increase Access to Behavioral Health Services

  • Over 170 pediatric members responded to questions about behavioral health barriers and education needs in the 2015 MNAAP member survey
  • Six teams, with parent/guardian/pediatric/behavioral health members, from rural and metro areas are participating in a nine-month project to integrate behavioral health into pediatric primary care with a quality improvement model
  • Over 100 pediatric clinicians received training on pediatric behavioral health issues
  • Identified at least ten collaborative models of integrated behavioral health and pediatric primary care in the state
  • Minnesota Community Measures beginning to report some behavioral health indicators of quality for pediatric care in 2015 (adolescent depression screening).

 

Address Need to Reduce Child Poverty and Disparities

  • Member survey respondents were not at all or somewhat familiar with referrals to appropriate agencies for cash, housing, child care, transportation and food assistance. They were most familiar with resources for medical assistance. Respondents said they would like to see a centralized resource for referrals.
  • Letter to the editor by Scott Schwantes, co-chair of the work group and longtime member, was published in April 2015 in the Pioneer Press 
  • Over 100 people registered to attend the morning education session on poverty/disparities
  • Risk stratification tool is under consideration by DHS and MNAAP has offered to provide ongoing input
  • $78,000 grant awarded to fund pilot projects at 2 clinics to screen for food/nutrition insecurity and refer people to SNAP-Ed as necessary
  • Collaborating with Bridge to Benefits on the possibility of a webinar for pediatric providers about their tool
  • Connected with a reporter at the Star Tribune about the possibility of writing an article on foster care children in the near future

 

Coordinated Successful Pediatricians’ Day at the Capitol

On March 18, 2015, more than 100 residents, pediatricians, and med students gathered at the Capitol to discuss and advocate for issues that have a direct impact on the health of children across Minnesota. This year’s legislative priorities included increasing immunization rates and improving access to care, particularly behavioral health care. The group also discussed legislation to increase funding for Minnesota’s poison control center, strengthen the state’s child protection system, and how to advocate for policies and programs that curb Minnesota’s high poverty rates among children.

 

Restored Minnesota’s Newborn Screening Program.

MNAAP led a statewide campaign to preserve newborn screening data so that it would remain available to parents and physicians for future health-related testing. Special thanks to many parent and coalition partners as well as Chief Authors Representative Kim Norton (Rochester) and Senator John Marty (Roseville) for their support of the bill, which was signed into law May 6.

 

Engaged at least 75 pediatricians in work groups, learning collaboratives and grant projects aimed at improving children’s health.

Much of the work focused on increasing immunization rates, encouraging a medical home for children with complex needs, reducing pediatric obesity rates, and promoting early brain development.

 

Urged Updated School and Daycare Immunization Rules.

MNAAP’s president testified in support of new and updated vaccine requirements to keep children healthy, including Hepatitis B, Hepatitis A, Tdap, Varicella, and Meningitis, effective September 1.

 

Coordinated Successful Pediatricians’ Day at the Capitol.

Legislators spoke with and heard from than 100 pediatric residents and pediatricians on March 26. Many of them continued to advocate for MNAAP’s top legislative priorities (newborn screening and anti-bullying legislation) until they were signed into law.

 

Named Outstanding Large Chapter of the Year by AAP.

Award winners were selected via a competitive application and interview process describing how the chapter has effectively advocated on behalf of families and pediatricians over the past year. A large chapter is defined as having between 500-1,000 members.

Advocacy for Children and Teens

  • Hosted Pediatricians’ Day at the Capitol, with more than 100 pediatricians and pediatric residents who met with legislators to discuss child health issues.
  • Advocated for Safe Routes to School and SHIP, now an established program with increased state funding.
  • Provided testimony and member education on the importance of preserving the newborn screening test results.
  • Sent letter and met with Commissioners of Health and Human Services to advocate for health care home payment reform and coordination of primary care and behavioral health homes.
  • Provided testimony/comments on Minnesota Health Reform , Essential Health Benefits and the MNsure exchange
  • Supported appointments of pediatrician members to the Governor’s Task Force on the Prevention of School Bullying (Tom Scott, MD), the AAP Committee on Pediatric Research (Anupam Kharbanda, MD), the AAP Committee on Nutrition (Sarah Jane Schwarzenberg, MD) the AAP Committee on Early Childhood (Chris Derauf, MD), the Minnesota Autism Task Force (Michael Reiff, MD), Minnesota Community Measures Pediatric Prevention Indicators workgroup (Robert Jacobson, MD, Anne Edwards, MD, Vijay Chawla, MD, Marilyn Peitso, MD)

 

Member and Community Education

  • Held immunization hesitancy training in Minneapolis and St. Cloud with more than 140 attendees and videotaped the training for future use.
  • Held pediatric quality improvement and measure development training and videotaped for future use and CME
  • Implemented a grant from AAP to partner with the pediatric residency programs at the University of Minnesota and Mayo to increase physical activity in low-income child care centers.
  • Distributed/promoted Somali parent education videos which have been downloaded by over 50,000 people internationally on early brain development, child safety, infant feeding and safe sleeping, newborn screening, use of car seats, television and children, use of the thermometer, immunization and autism with funds from AAP.
  • Assisted members with development of grant proposals to implement pediatric priorities in their communities, including medical homes for foster children (Amelia Burgess, MD), oral health for rural children/teens in Willmar (KerriAnn Mahon), adolescent immunization projects (Dawn Martin, MD, Julia Joseph-DiCaprio, MD), pediatric technology projects (Children’s Hospitals and Clinic of MN), Pediatric Telemedicine (Peter Dehnel, MD), child care medication administration training and Building Bridges for Early Childhood Education (Laurel Wills, MD)
  • Co-hosted Rural Health Conference with Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota with participation from Allina Health and CentraCare for rural pediatricians hear about chapter activities and opportunities for rural practices
  • Re-designed MNAAP website at www.mnaap.org

 

Chapter Leadership

  • Increased chapter membership from 887 to 959 pediatricians and pediatric residents.
  • Developed and implemented three pediatric Maintenance of Certification Part 4 (MOC 4) quality improvement programs on obesity, immunizations and medical homes/healthcare homes with the American Board of Pediatrics approval.
  • Formed a Board level Quality Committee to support MOC offerings
  • Engaged over 75 members in workgroups on obesity prevention, immunizations, health care home development, communications, membership, and public policy.

 

Partnerships to Promote Child/Teen Health

  • Partnered with the Minnesota Department of Health to promote National Infant Immunization Week through letters to the editor from pediatricians around the state.
  • Began meeting with Minnesota Council of Health Plans to address obesity referral/ reimbursement issues.
  • Working with parents and/or community health workers on identified health care issues and access barriers for new immigrants in Minneapolis, Rochester, St. Cloud, Willmar and Fergus Falls.
  • With Wellshare International and CentraCare Foundation, using community health workers in three Minnesota clinics to better serve Somali and Liberian immigrant populations (Anne Edwards, MD, Emily Borman-Shoap, MD, Amelia Burgess, MD, Marilyn Peitso, MD)
  • Worked with Minnesota agencies (MDH, DHS, MN Community Measures, ICSI) on quality measures on key pediatric issues, including preventative care and asthma, obesity prevention and depression screening.
  • Partnered with Minnesota Department of Human Services, Seattle Children’s Hospital and Family Voices-Minnesota on a multi-year project to develop quality indicators for a Center of Excellence for Children and engaged 52 pediatricians at 29 clinics statewide to assist in the measure development.

Advocacy for Children and Teens

  • Hosted Peds Day at the Capitol, with more than 100 pediatricians and pediatric residents who met with legislators to discuss child health issues.
  • Defeated effort to create law limiting minor consent.
  • Advocated for Safe Routes to School, now an established program signed into law.
  • Provided testimony and member education on the importance of preserving the integrity of newborn screening.
  • Sent letter to Commissioner of Health and continued opposition about recent policy change that would restrict all private clinics from providing MN VFC vaccines to underinsured children.
  • Advocated for the addition of several vaccines to Minnesota sports physical forms that have since been added.
  • Provided testimony/comments on Minnesota Health Reform and Public Health.
  • Supported appointments of pediatrician members to the Governor’s Task Force on the Prevention of School Bullying (Tom Scott, MD), AAP Councils on Private Payer Advisory Committee (Peter Dehnel, MD), AAP Nutrition Committee (Sarah Jane Schwarzenberg, MD), The Minnesota Autism Task Force (Michael Reiff, MD), the Health Care Home Payment Methodology Work Group (Marilyn Peitso, MD), the Health Care Home certification committee (Amy Burt, MD), and Minnesota Community Measures Pediatric Prevention Indicators workgroup (Robert Jacobson, MD, Anne Edwards, MD, Vijay Chawla, MD, Marilyn Peitso, MD).

 

Member and Community Education

  • Held immunization hesitancy and obesity prevention conference with more than 125 attendees.
  • Hosted a series of CME webinars on pediatric obesity with a total of 50 plus attendees and collected a list of helpful obesity tools and resources.
  • Selected by NICHQ (National Institute for Children’s Healthcare Quality) to lead a multi-sector team to reduce overweight/obesity rates among Latino children ages 2-11 and their families in Minneapolis (Julie Boman, MD).
  • Received a grant from AAP to partner with the pediatric residency programs at the University of Minnesota and Mayo to increase physical activity in low-income child care centers (Emily Borman-Shoap, MD; Brian Lynch, MD).
  • Supported the development of Somali parent education videos on early brain development, child safety, infant feeding and safe sleeping, newborn screening, use of car seats, television and children, use of the thermometer with funds from AAP.
  • Assisted members with development of grant proposals to implement pediatric priorities in their communities, including early hearing loss education (Lisa Schimmenti, MD), oral health screening (Eileen Crespo, MD) and medical homes for foster children (Amelia Burgess, MD), adolescent immunization projects (Dawn Martin, MD, Julia Joseph-DiCaprio, MD), transitions in care for teens to adult care (Peter Scal, MD, Brad Benson, MD), pediatric technology projects (Children’s Hospitals and Clinic of MN).
  • Hosted Peds Day at the Park for rural pediatricians, members, and pediatric residents to hear about chapter activities and opportunities for rural practice at an August 2011 Minnesota Twins game.

 

Chapter Leadership

  • Increased chapter membership from 887 to 959 pediatricians and pediatric residents.
  • Developed and received/seeking American Board of Pediatrics approval for three pediatric Maintenance of Certification-part 4 (MOC 4) quality improvement programs on obesity, immunizations, and medical homes/health care homes.
  • Engaged over 70 members in workgroups on obesity prevention, immunizations, health care home development, communications, membership, and public policy.

 

Partnerships to promote child/teen health

  • Co-hosted May 24 rural health meeting with Children’s Hospital to reach/engage rural pediatricians.
  • Partnered with the Minnesota Department of Health to promote Infant Immunization Week through letters to the editor from pediatricians around the state.
  • Began meeting with Minnesota Council of Health Plans to address obesity referral/reimbursement issues.
  • Working with parents and/or community health workers, identified health care issues and access barriers surrounding new immigrants in Minneapolis, Rochester, St. Cloud and Brooklyn Center.
  • With Wellshare International and CentraCare Foundation, piloting the use of community health workers in four Minnesota clinics to better serve Somali and Liberian immigrant populations (Anne Edwards, MD; Emily Borman-Shoap, MD; Amelia Burgess, MD; Marilyn Peitso, MD).
  • In partnership with MN Department of Human Services, piloting ASQ screening of Somali children through oral translation and a Somali education video.
  • Partnered with MN Department of Human Services and CDC on grant proposal to pilot a text4kids technology in Minnesota.
  • Worked with Minnesota agencies (MDH, DHS, MN Community Measures, ICSI) on quality measures and potential payment restructuring on key pediatric issues, including preventative care and asthma.
  • Partnered with Minnesota Department of Human Services and Family Voices-Minnesota on a project to develop quality indicators for a Center of Excellence for Children with chronic health conditions.
  • Continued discussions and member webinars with the Departments of Health and Human Services and Medicaid-managed care plans to explore interest in a universal vaccine purchase and group vaccine purchasing options.
  • Partnered with the Minnesota chapter of the American College of Physicians, and the Minnesota Academy of Family Physicians to support a grant to AHQR on disseminating research on Patient-Centered Outcomes to Primary Care physicians.
  • Partnered with AAP and the Minnesota Department of Health on increasing education to child care providers on early brain development, and pediatric preventive health (Laurel Wills, MD).
  • Hosted four learning sessions on health care homes, educating more than 500 participants.
  • Supported implementation of health care home in 22 primary care clinics serving 12,000 children. Hosted six webinars on health care homes and five conferences, educating more than 600 providers and clinic staff and providing CME and nursing contact hours.
  • Invited Sen. Klobuchar and candidates for governor to speak at our annual meeting, which drew more than 100 pediatricians.
  • Supported an autism health care home pilot program with 7 clinics.
  • Delivered increased reimbursement for primary care coordination. Provided an additional $250-$450 per six months per patient to more than 25 pediatric and family physician clinics statewide.
  • Developed task forces on child safety, newborn screening, childhood obesity, and immunizations. Held more than 60 individual meetings with legislators on these issues.
  • Participated in MDH workgroups related to quality measures and potential payment restructuring on key pediatric issues, including preventative care and asthma.
  • Helped to pass booster seat legislation, modifying seat belt requirements and requiring children under age 8 to ride in a booster seat.
  • Hosted a CME forum with MDH and MDE on autism in the Somali community, involving over 170 attendees representing health, education and parents statewide. Hosted focus groups with more than 40 Somali parents to discuss ways to educate the community about the importance of vaccines.
  • Identified healthcare issues and barriers surrounding new immigrants in target communities: St. Paul (Somali community), Rochester (Mayo grant for outreach to Somali community) and Brooklyn Center (West Africans).
  • Developed an educational presentation for providers about maintenance of certification.
  • Analyzed data on fluoride varnish education and outreach to 150 clinics through MN-CHIP.
  • Provided support and exposure to an Asian teen runaway prevention project through Healthy Tomorrows grant.
  • Increased the number of clinics involved in Reach out and Read from 45 to 64.
  • Developed curriculum for an elective on advocacy for pediatric residents.
  • Hosted Peds Day at the Capitol, matching 30 pediatricians with their legislators.
  • Partnered with MN Academy of Family Physicians and the MN Chapter of the American College of Physicians to promote primary care and health care home standards that included pediatric priorities.
  • Through our Foundation, brought in over $445,000 in new project grant funds for Minnesota projects.
  • Increased chapter membership to more than 900 members.
  • Increased communication to members via an updated website, regular emails, and quarterly newsletters.
  • Selected as Outstanding Large Chapter of the Year by AAP!

The American Academy of Pediatrics was founded in 1931 with a group of 35 physicians from all over the United States. The Minnesota Chapter was founded in 1933 with 11 members.

Fast facts about the Minnesota Chapter:

  • 1934: First Chapter President is elected: EJ Huenekens with 22 members
  • 1949: First annual meeting with 45 members
  • 2007: Membership grew to 600 members
  • 2018: Membership has grown to more than 1,020 members

 

1949-1959

  • E. J. Huenekens, MD, served as the first president for five years. He worked in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota Medical School. By the end of his term, membership had grown to 25 pediatricians.
  • During the first ten years, Chapter activity evolved slowly. It was 1956 before Minnesota pediatricians began to think of the Academy Chapter as an action group separate and distinct from the Northwestern Pediatric Society. Gradually, the new organization took over many of the activities of the Child Health Committee of the Minnesota Medical Association (MMA) as well as those of the Northwest Pediatric Society.
  • In that year, Dr. Al Schroeder was appointed chairman of a chapter committee on juvenile delinquency. For the rest of the decade he did a superb job centering around the Teen-Age code, which was put into practice by a number of Twin Cities and state schools. His work received recognition not only in Minnesota but throughout the nation. The Chapter supported his exhibit at the annual MMA meeting in 1958.
  • A liaison committee was formed in 1959 in conjunction with other interested groups to advise the State Health Department about the use of oral polio vaccine. Its activities continued until at least 1964.
  • Operation “Poison Proof” was begun in 1958 by the Accident Committee, headed by Dr. Robert Semsch.

 

1960-1969

  • Civil Defense was a major national governmental program during the early ‘60s, reaching into even the smallest Minnesota communities. The Chapter addressed children’s problems, a badly needed addition to the original governmental plans.
  • The institution of the Minnesota “relative value scale” to help physicians with fair charges was begun and completed by a committee of the MMA with members of the Academy Chapter participating.
  • Cooperative work with various adoption agencies in the state was carried out by Dr. Arnold Anderson, chairman of the national AAP Committee on Adoptions.
  • Members put together a directory of Minnesota institutions that cared for children with psychiatric problems.
  • In 1966, a symposium on athletic injuries, organized in cooperation with state schools, was arranged by a Chapter committee.
  • In 1960, a state chapter newsletter began publication.

 

1970-1979

  • The possibility of national health insurance becoming was discussed, as were other ways the federal and state governments were affecting medical practice.
  • The Minnesota Chapter spent a great deal of time and effort trying to understand preschool and school screening programs. In addition, the Chapter held conferences with representatives from these agencies to eliminate duplicated efforts while insuring the best care for the children involved.
  • The Academy and the Chapter urged that children be kept in the mainstream of health care rather than put in a compartmentalized program.

 

1980-1985

  • Senator David Durenberger was recognized for his role in legislation that allowed a Maternal and Children’s Health Block Grant.
  • There was continued activity in the Coalition for Quality Health Education in the public schools, which included Academy members’ appearances before state Senate and House committees.
  • The Academy supported mandated education for the handicapped. Dr. Richard Nelson organized in-service training programs for physicians who dealt with handicapped children.
  • The WIC (Woman, Infant, Child) nutrition program was re-endorsed by the Chapter. The Accident Prevention Committee worked with the Minnesota Department of Health and the Minnesota Safety Council to reduce motor vehicle injuries, to make an infant’s first ride a safe one and to pass the mandatory use of proper child passenger restraints for those under age four.
  • The videotape, Coaches World, was produced to instruct amateur coaches who deal with pre-adolescent children. This tape was developed by the Sports Medicine Committee in cooperation with Gillette Children’s Hospital, the American Red Cross, the Institute for Athletic Medicine, and the Minnesota High School League.
  • The Chapter Committee on Adoptions and Immigration worked with various state agencies on problems of adoption and immigration of Southeast Asian children.
  • The Chapter established a research fund to help practicing pediatricians develop research projects.
  • In 1985 the Chapter’s Child Advocacy Committee co-sponsored with the MMA a symposium of child sexual abuse and was active in educating pediatricians and family physicians on this important topic.
  • On the national level, the Chapter was active in legislation regarding Baby Doe regulations, preventative health care, and vaccine injury compensation. The Chapter and members were active in promoting childhood immunizations.

 

 

The Chapter has grown to approximately 1000 members and re-positioned itself to continue improving child health, quality, education, health care systems, and practice management. It played a key role in developing legislation to create a children’s health plan, which later became Minnesota Care. It has also played a key role in increasing Minnesota’s immunization rates.

In 2009 the Chapter pushed hard for child passenger safety, recommending children over the age of 4 be put in a booster seat. This became state law in May of 2009. In 2014 the Chapter led efforts to pass Minnesota’s newborn screening restoration bill to prevent blood spots and test results from being automatically destroyed and jeopardizing the health of Minnesota children.

Currently, the Chapter is working on a variety of projects to improve access to behavioral health services, reduce poverty/disparities, strengthen child abuse screening and referrals and increase

 

Year President
2016-2018 Andrew Kiragu, MD
2014-2016 Susan A. Berry, MD
2012-2014 Robert M. Jacobson, MD
2010-2012 Marilyn Peitso, MD
2006-2010 Anne Edwards, MD
2006 Josh Petrikin, MD
2004-2006 Jeff Schiff, MD
2002-2004 Charles Oberg, MD
2000-2002 Kathleen Sweetman, MD
1998-2000 Michael Severson, MD
1996-1998 Joseph Rigatuso, MD
1994-1996 Daniel Broughton, MD
1992-1994 James Moore, MD
1990-1992 Carolyn McKay, MD
1988-1990 Susan Mahle, MD
1985-1988 G. Scott Giebink, MD
1982-1985 Lowell Barr, MD
1979-1982 James Moller, MD
1976-1979 Stephen Sommers, MD
1973-1976 William Bevis, MD
1970-1973 Edmund Burke, MD
1966-1970 Walter Wilder, MD
1964-1966 Robert Bergan, MD
1961-1964 Albert Schroeder, MD
1958-1961 George Logan, MD
1955-1958 Harold Flanagan, MD
1952-1955 Lawrence Richdorf, MD
1945-1952 Roland Nuting, MD
1939-1945 Roger L. Kennedy, MD
1934-1938 E.J. Huenekens, MD

 

Annual Sponsors